Quantum dot-based assays to offer new ways to understand cell biology

Jul 07, 2004

Evident Technologies and Upstate announced that they have signed an agreement to produce quantum dot-based products for the life science industry under an agreement signed today. Terms and conditions of the agreement have not been disclosed.

Upstate, the leader in innovative cell signaling products for life science research and drug discovery, will be using EviTags, Evident's proprietary fluorescent nanocrystals to produce new forms of quantum dot-based conjugates offering increased photo-stability and multicolor fluorescence. EviTags are available in wavelengths from blue through the visible spectrum and into the near infrared. Evident is a pioneer in the development of advanced nanomaterials and a leading commercial source for a wide range of quantum dot material systems.

“We are excited by the prospect of EviTags and are pleased to be working with this new form of quantum dot nanobiotechnology. We believe that EviTags offer many advantages to understanding
cells that will be very important for our research and biotech industry customers,” said Sheridan G.
Snyder, Chairman and CEO of Upstate. “Evident Technologies' new quantum dot technology, combined with our cell signaling capabilities may lead to many new ways to conduct cell research.”

“We are looking forward to working with Upstate, the leader in many innovative and advanced cell
signaling products, using our EviTags. Conjugating proteins to quantum dots offer distinct advantages over traditional organic fluorophores, including greatly improved photostability, color multiplexing, and single-source excitation,” said Clinton Ballinger, Ph.D., CEO of Evident Technologies, “With these attributes, researchers can perform more tests, see more detail within cells and the freedom to perform long-term imaging.”

Quantum dot conjugates are the next stage in the evolution of biotechnology research tools and offer improved photostability, single source optical excitation, and a multiplicity of tunable narrow-band emission colors that span the visible and infrared spectrum. With these attributes, researchers can perform more tests, see more details in cells and have freedom to perform long-term imaging.

The original press release can be found here.

Explore further: Study sheds new light on why batteries go bad

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Final pieces to the circadian clock puzzle found

9 hours ago

Researchers at the UNC School of Medicine have discovered how two genes – Period and Cryptochrome – keep the circadian clocks in all human cells in time and in proper rhythm with the 24-hour day, as well ...

Measuring modified protein structures

13 hours ago

Swiss researchers have developed a new approach to measure proteins with structures that change. This could enable new diagnostic tools for the early recognition of neurodegenerative diseases to be developed.

New insights in survival strategies of bacteria

13 hours ago

Bacteria are particularly ingenious when it comes to survival strategies. They often create a biofilm to protect themselves from a hostile environment, for example during treatment with antibiotics. A biofilm is a bacterial ...

Recommended for you

Study sheds new light on why batteries go bad

17 hours ago

A comprehensive look at how tiny particles in a lithium ion battery electrode behave shows that rapid-charging the battery and using it to do high-power, rapidly draining work may not be as damaging as researchers ...

Moving silicon atoms in graphene with atomic precision

Sep 12, 2014

Richard Feynman famously posed the question in 1959: is it possible to see and manipulate individual atoms in materials? For a time his vision seemed more science fiction than science, but starting with groundbreaking ...

Aligned carbon nanotube / graphene sandwiches

Sep 12, 2014

By in situ nitrogen doping and structural hybridization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene via a two-step chemical vapor deposition (CVD), scientists have fabricated nitrogen-doped aligned carbon nanotu ...

User comments : 0