SAMSUNG Demonstrates Push-To-All Technology

Feb 25, 2005
Push-To-All Technology

Samsung Electronics, a leading wireless communications company, is proud to announce the development of a working PTA (Push-to-All) solution. The demonstration of the PTA solution proto-type took place at the company's Telecommunications R&D Center in Suwon, Korea.

This total mobile communications solution incorporates the existing PTT (Push-to-Talk) one to multi-user voice technology with the one to multi-user video conferencing ability of PTV (Push-to-View) and multimedia file sharing function of PTD (Push-to Data).

The core benefit of PTA handsets is the synchronous video conferencing. Similar to a walkie-talkie with video capabilities, the speaker's image appears instantly on the handset screen of the user or multiple users on the call. It is a convenient and time-saving function that allows people in multiple locations to easily conduct virtual meetings. In addition, the PTA handset allows one to send image, video clip and music contents to multiple users through one simple operation on a mobile device at one time.

Samsung Electronics plans to offer a commercialized PTA solution handset using not only EV-DO technology but also EDGE, UMTS, and WiFi standards.

Explore further: Samsung may launch first Tizen phone in India

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Victoria team defend title with speedy robot

23 minutes ago

A team from Victoria's School of Engineering and Computer Science, led by Robby Lopez, beat 15 other teams from Australian and New Zealand universities to take top honours in the 2013 competition with its ...

Line says no IPO this year

57 minutes ago

The Japan-based operator of popular mobile messaging app Line said Monday it has decided not to go ahead with an initial public offering in Japan or overseas this year.

Yale engineer to build 'hot' solar cells

1 hour ago

Associate professor of electrical engineering Minjoo Larry Lee has been awarded $2,540,000 to develop dual-junction solar cells that can operate efficiently at extreme temperatures above 750 degrees Fahrenheit. ...

User comments : 0