Fingerprints replace keys

Jan 31, 2005

The Finnish company Deltabit Oy is creating awareness of access-control systems that are replacing traditional keys. A fingerprint already opens the door to keep-fit rooms at Tampere, Finland.
Deltabit Oy has been developing systems and applications based on fingerprint recognition for more than six years. The basic idea is the keyless concept. Fingerprint recognition can be used in access control for opening doors, controlling burglar alarms and supervising working hours. The only limitations are those set by the imagination.

"Our focus in the field of biometric identification is on entrance control systems, customer-management systems and on patient and personal identification systems at hospitals," says managing director Jouna Järviö.

A solution for every home

The solutions that Deltabit develops are easy to use. Markets are to be found where strong identification is needed.

"With biometric identification the person to be identified does not need to carry anything. A mere finger is enough. Recognition is very easy, quick and reliable. You can't forget or lose a finger, nor can you lend it to a friend," Järviö says.

Deltabit is at present developing a simple, one-door biometric entrance control unit that can be used with low-rise housing, terraced dwellings and blocks of flats. A keyless solution that is suitable for every home is expected to be coming onto the market at the beginning of 2005.

"A recognition system is being designed for libraries in which a fingerprint will replace the traditional library card. We're also developing a biometric regular-customer system for restaurants."

Promising field, little competition

A promising future lies ahead for biometric identifiers. Yet competition in the field is minimal. In Scandinavia, besides Deltabit, there is only one other company in the same business. Companies are focusing on western Europe, the United States and the Far East. Deltabit's foothold on the market is increasing.

"In five to seven years' time biometric identifiers will be a strong factor alongside present identification. It's not beyond of the realms of possibility that biometric identification will replace traditional methods.

Source: Tekes (National Technology Agency)

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