TI Imaging Processor Powers Samsung's World's First Camera Phone with HDD

Jan 19, 2005

Texas Instruments today announced Samsung Electronics has selected TI's imaging processor technology for the world's first camera phone with a hard disk drive for storing images and video. Samsung, a global leader in telecommunication, semiconductor and digital handsets, has also selected TI imaging processor technology for three additional camera phones.
Samsung has chosen TI´s OMAP-DM270 processor, an extension to TI´s widely adopted OMAP processor portfolio, to power its new camera phone model. The camera phone with hard-disk drive includes a video-on demand feature.

"Samsung is committed to innovate in the mobile phone industry and to deliver the most unique products with features demanded by consumers," said HunBae Kim, Vice President of Samsung's Research and Development team. "By using TI's high-performance imaging processor, Samsung is able to deliver high-resolution still images and high-performance video to its camera-enabled feature phones."

Today's announcement underscores TI's commitment to work with its customers to deliver entertainment to the mobile phone. TI's OMAP platform supports leading mobile entertainment applications, such as camera phones, video recording, and 3D games. Meeting consumer expectations for a secure, state-of-the-art entertainment experience on the mobile phone will be a strong step toward making trendy mobile features "must-have," revenue-generating services.

"Built-in camera and camcorder functionality on handsets are becoming key application requirements by consumers for today's mobile phones," said Terry Cheng, President, TI Asia. "We are very pleased that Samsung is leveraging the processing power of TI's industry-leading OMAP platform to address the phenomenal growth of camera phones in the marketplace."

These new Samsung camera phones are available to consumers today in Korea.

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