SAMSUNG Begins Investment in LCD Line 7-2

Dec 29, 2004

Samsung Electronics, the leader in TFT-LCD technology, announced today that it would begin construction of a Line 7-2 at its fabrication facility in Tanjeong, Korea.
Samsung will make a 290 billion won (US$273 million) investment in order to start off the construction of the building for the new line. Line 7-2 will be located to the west of Samsung's Line 7-1. The fabrication facility will be about 300,000 square meters while the module assembly facility will be about 93,000 square meters. Line 7-1, the joint venture between Samsung Electronics and Sony Corporation, is the world's first 7 th Generation line and production is scheduled to begin in the first half of 2005.

Following market acceptance of 32-inch LCD panels, Samsung is well positioned to take the lead in standardizing 40-inch and 46-inch LCD TV panels with this early capital investment. The construction of Line 7-2 is in response to the rapid growth in demand for 30-inch and larger LCD TVs and production is scheduled to begin in the first half of 2006.

“With Line 7-2, Samsung will secure a stable supply from which we can deliver high-quality, affordable LCD TV panels,” said Sang Wan Lee, president and CEO of Samsung's LCD Business. “This will solidify Samsung's leadership position in the industry as it standardizes large-sized LCD TVs.”

Currently, Samsung is analyzing the glass size and production capacity that will be most appropriate for the Line 7-2 facility.

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