Micron Ships First Production 2 Gigabyte 90 Nanometer NAND Flash Memory Products Today

Dec 20, 2004

Micron Technology, Inc., today shipped the Company’s first production 2 gigabit (Gb) NAND flash memory products, hitting the target of its entry strategy into the NAND market. The demand for increased memory in mobile and mass storage applications positions NAND flash as one of the fastest-growing semiconductor segments. Micron’s entry into this space with next-generation 2Gb densities enables the Company to capitalize on this segment growth.

Aimed at flash cards, USB devices, mass storage devices and mobile applications, the addition of NAND flash memory complements Micron’s broad portfolio of memory and CMOS image sensor solutions. NAND flash memory not only enables Micron to provide a greater suite of memory solutions to customers, but the Company is able to leverage its competence in DRAM process technology to support customers with a robust roadmap of highly reliable, high performance products at greater densities.

“The NAND market is projected to be $7 billion in 2004 and $8.7 billion in 2005, positioning it as the fastest growing memory market. As one of the first companies to deliver 2Gb NAND products, Micron’s entry with this device is opportune as it aligns with the transition to the 2Gb density as the volume driver,” said Alan Niebel, Web-Feet Research, Inc.

“In only 18 months, we’ve moved from initial design to production volumes with an entirely new technology manufactured on an advanced process node,” said Achim Hill, Micron’s senior director of mobile memory marketing. “To enable our customers to quickly ramp their product development, we’re delivering the density, power dissipation, packaging, models, reference code and controller compatibility they require. With process migration plans from 90nm to 72nm and 58nm, our roadmap will continue to reflect the configurations, densities, packaging and tools to support our customers’ next generation products.”

Micron’s 2Gb NAND flash memory is manufactured on a 90 nanometer (nm) process technology, and is verified with many major NAND controllers to be drop-in compatible with existing 2Gb NAND devices utilizing those controllers. To aid with product design, software reference code and simulation models are available on Micron's Web site at www.micron.com and subject to Micron's standard license terms. Micron is currently in volume production of their 2Gb NAND flash memory with increasing production volumes anticipated throughout 2005 to support growing customer demand.

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