Canadian Ansari X PRIZE Team Receives Government Approval to launch into Space

Oct 02, 2004
Da Vinci Project

The Golden Palace.com Space Program Powered by the da Vinci Project announced today that it has received full authorization approval from the Canadian government to launch its manned flights to space.
"It’s a major milestone in the project", says Brian Feeney, Team Leader and pilot of the teams Wild Fire MKVI spacecraft. "I’m incredibly proud of the entire team who contributed to this very large task. It demonstrates the team’s depth of experience and drive to achieve our goal of putting a man into space through a privately funded program."

The Golden Palace.com Space Program Powered by the da Vinci Project is a leading contender for the Ansari X PRIZE and is only the 2nd team in the competition to receive government approval.

“This is a major step toward our upcoming flights. Our team and Canada is on the forefront of putting the 2nd private manned spacecraft in the world into space”, said Brian Feeney.

The manned launch approval is for planned flights to space that will be conducted from Kindersley, Saskatchewan.

About The Golden Palace.com Space Program Powered by the da Vinci Project

The Golden Palace.com Space Program Powered by the da Vinci Project's aim of capturing the Ansari X PRIZE, the international "New Race to Space(R)" is backed by a core of volunteers from many walks of life and disciplines. Aerospace engineers, experts in project management and finance contribute their time and expertise towards the realization of the next step in Human discovery. The Project's novel rocket design will be launched from the world's largest reusable helium balloon at an altitude of 80,000 feet (24,400 meters). To learn more, visit http: //www.davinciproject.com.

About the ANSARI X PRIZE Competition

In order to win the ANSARI X PRIZE, teams must build a safe/reusable space vehicle able to carry one pilot and the weight equivalent of two passengers 100km (62 miles) into sub-orbital space. The vehicle must be privately financed and safely launched twice within a two-week period. The first registered ANSARI X PRIZE team to complete this feat will win the $10 million prize and spectacular trophy.

Explore further: Mysteries of space dust revealed

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