Industry's Highest Power Density Thin SOT23 Buck Switching Regulators

Sep 29, 2004
Industry’s Highest Power Density Thin SOT23 Buck Switching Regulators

LM273x Family of Buck Regulators Offers Clock Speeds of up to 3 MHz in Ultra-Small Packaging

National Semiconductor Corporation today introduced a new family of switching buck regulators that combine small-outline packaging with the industry's best performance for the highest power density.

The first two members of the family are the LM2734 and LM2736. The LM2734 can convert an input voltage of 3 V to 20 V down to as low as 0.8 V at an output current of up to 1 A. The LM2736 can convert an input voltage of 3 V to 18 V down to as low as 1.25 V at an output current of up to 750 mA. They both operate at switching frequencies as high as 3 MHz and are packaged in a Thin SOT23-6. Because of this high power density, the regulators are optimized for applications that require high-current switching, such as xDSL modems, consumer applications powered by AC adapters and set-top-boxes. The LM2734 and LM2736 are designed on National's proprietary PVIP050 process, a sub-micron BCD process that increases the products' industry-leading power density.

"The introduction of the LM2734 and LM2736 sets a new standard for power management performance from National Semiconductor," said Paul Greenland, marketing director for National Semiconductor's Power Management group. "The LM2734 and LM2736 combine a high-performance power process and thermally enhanced, small-outline packaging, making them the best solution for applications that are space-constrained, yet still require power management without compromise."

About the LM2734 and LM2736
Key features of National's LM2734 and LM2736 high-frequency buck regulators:

-- Thin SOT23-6 package, switching frequencies as high as 3 MHz and minimal external components result in the industry’s highest power density
-- Current mode control and internal compensation allow stable operation over a wide input voltage range and reduction of line transients
-- Pulse width modulation (PWM) provides a predictable, easily filtered switching frequency
-- The LM2734 is designed to handle an output current of up to 1 A and the LM2736 handles an output current up to 750 mA
-- The LM2734 operates from a 3 V to 20 V input and the LM2736 operates from a 3 V to 18 V input
-- Both have 550 KHz, 1.6 MHz and 3 MHz versions. The 550 KHz and 1.6 MHz versions are available now and the 3 MHz version will be available by year end
-- The LM2734 can step-down to a voltage as low as 0.8 V and the LM2736 down as low as 1.25 V
-- Both parts have protection features such as pulse-by-pulse current limit and thermal shutdown

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