Observing a Photon no Longer a Seek-and-Destroy Mission

Jun 02, 2004

A team of University of Queensland, Australia physicists has devised a sophisticated measurement system for single particles of light, or photons, enabling them to investigate fascinating behaviour in the quantum world.

In a world-first, the path of a single photon can now be measured without destroying the photon in the process.

One of the most surprising and unexpected aspects of quantum mechanics is the propensity for a photon to behave both like a particle and a wave.

The measurement developed at the Centre for Quantum Computer Technology within UQ’s School of Physical Sciences has enabled these wave-like and particle-like properties of a single photon to be observed simultaneously.

The breakthrough innovation by Drs Geoff Pryde, Jeremy O’Brien, Andrew White, Stephen Bartlett and Associate Professor Tim Ralph was recently published in the American Physical Society’s Physical Review Letters.

The quintessential experiment demonstrating the wave-like properties of light was English physicist Thomas Young’s c.1801 experiment where light was shone on a pair of holes in a screen. Interference between the two possible paths gave rise to an interference pattern on a second screen behind the holes — a wave-like phenomenon.

The remarkable thing is that this wave-like behaviour persists even when the light is so dim that only a single photon is present in the apparatus at any given time.

“That is unless the experimenter observes a particle-like property by measuring which path the photon took — in that case the interference disappears,” Dr O’Brien said.

In the UQ experiment, the researchers found that indeed the more particle-like the photon’s behaviour was, the less wave-like behaviour was observed, and vice versa.

The experiment shows once and for all that light is essentially fickle — sometimes behaving as particles and at others, like waves.

To measure the path of single photon, the team observed a second photon which carried away information about the first after the two interacted.

The experiment involved shining a powerful ultra-violet laser in to a special crystal to produce the two photons; a circuit of optical fibres; lenses and other optical elements; and normal destructive single photon detectors.

The original news release can be found on the University of Queensland web-site.

Explore further: 'Comb on a chip' powers new atomic clock design

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Surrey NanoSystems has "super black" material

Jul 15, 2014

(Phys.org) —A British company says it has scored a breakthrough in the world's darkest material. Surrey NanoSystems describes its development as not just a black material but super-black. They are calling ...

Nanophotonics experts create powerful molecular sensor

23 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Nanophotonics experts at Rice University have created a unique sensor that amplifies the optical signature of molecules by about 100 billion times. Newly published tests found the device could ...

Recommended for you

'Comb on a chip' powers new atomic clock design

4 hours ago

Researchers from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and California Institute of Technology (Caltech) have demonstrated a new design for an atomic clock that is based on a chip-scale ...

Quantum leap in lasers brightens future for quantum computing

4 hours ago

Dartmouth scientists and their colleagues have devised a breakthrough laser that uses a single artificial atom to generate and emit particles of light. The laser may play a crucial role in the development of quantum computers, ...

Technique simplifies the creation of high-tech crystals

4 hours ago

Highly purified crystals that split light with uncanny precision are key parts of high-powered lenses, specialized optics and, potentially, computers that manipulate light instead of electricity. But producing ...

A new multi-bit 'spin' for MRAM storage

6 hours ago

Interest in magnetic random access memory (MRAM) is escalating, thanks to demand for fast, low-cost, nonvolatile, low-consumption, secure memory devices. MRAM, which relies on manipulating the magnetization ...

User comments : 0