Rare butterfly experiences baby boom

Mar 19, 2008

Southern California biologists are searching for new places to release a bumper crop of endangered Palos Verdes blue butterflies.

The rare butterfly was nearly extinct two years ago but a federal breeding program has been so successful there aren't enough approved places for them to be released this year, the Los Angeles Times reported Tuesday.

While there were only about 220 in the wild last spring, 2,400 have emerged in the last two weeks in a laboratory at Moorpark College. Because they are a federally protected species, landowners must be willing to accept the butterflies with all their protections, the newspaper said. The land must also have enough yellow-flowering deer weed plants to shelter the tiny butterflies.

"We've accommodated what we can with the areas that are currently available," U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service spokeswoman Jane Hendron told the Times. "They may not all get a chance to live in the wild."

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Battling superbugs with gene-editing system

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Three comets for northern hemisphere observers

Sep 10, 2014

As the Chinese proverb says, "May you live in interesting times," and while the promise of Comet ISON dazzling observers didn't exactly pan out as hoped for in early 2014, we now have a bevy of binocular ...

A single evolutionary road may lead to Rome

Sep 08, 2014

A well-known biologist once theorized that many roads led to Rome when it comes to two distantly related organisms evolving a similar trait. A new paper, published in Nature Communications, suggests that w ...

Recommended for you

Battling superbugs with gene-editing system

11 hours ago

In recent years, new strains of bacteria have emerged that resist even the most powerful antibiotics. Each year, these superbugs, including drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis and staphylococcus, infect ...

Dwindling wind may tip predator-prey balance

Sep 19, 2014

Bent and tossed by the wind, a field of soybean plants presents a challenge for an Asian lady beetle on the hunt for aphids. But what if the air—and the soybeans—were still?

Environmental pollutants make worms susceptible to cold

Sep 19, 2014

Some pollutants are more harmful in a cold climate than in a hot, because they affect the temperature sensitivity of certain organisms. Now researchers from Danish universities have demonstrated how this ...

Research helps steer mites from bees

Sep 19, 2014

A Simon Fraser University chemistry professor has found a way to sway mites from their damaging effects on bees that care and feed the all-important queen bee.

User comments : 0