Britain looks to reducing food ads

Mar 28, 2006

Britain's Office of Communications has been examining the case for restricting food and drink advertising on television aimed at children.

Ofcom said it had been asked by the Department of Health and the Department for Culture, Media and Sport to look into the case amid growing concerns about rising childhood obesity and the over-consumption of foods high in fat, salt and sugar.

The ministry came up with a total of four proposals to cut back on food ads geared towards younger viewers, such as putting advertising time restrictions on specific food products; putting time restrictions on all food ads; keeping the time allocated to food product ads low; or combining all of the previous three proposals.

"With childhood obesity, the case for targeted action has been made; but which action -- and how this should be implemented -- is the focus for this final stage of consultation," Ofcom Chief Executive Stephen Carter said in a news release.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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