Polymer composite provides better fire protection than steel

Mar 27, 2006

The U.S. Navy needs lighter materials so ships will go further faster. One way to do that is to use new composite materials. But how will these materials respond to fire -- one of the most critical safety concerns on a ship? Virginia Tech material scientists have developed models to test composites for fire resistance – and have a recommendation.

John Bausano, a doctoral student in the chemistry-engineering interdisciplinary Macromolecular Science and Infrastructure Engineering program at Virginia Tech, will present his research in the Excellence in Graduate Polymer Science Research Symposium at the 231st American Chemical Society National Meeting in Atlanta on March 26-30.

Working with Jack Lesko, associate professor of engineering science and mechanics, Bausano developed a testing method – a one-sided heat flux test that can be used on a sample as small as one inch by six inches (1x6") to test a commercially available material – E-glass vinyl ester composite laminates. One side of the material is heated to simulate fire on one side of a wall. A load is placed on one edge to simulate a load-bearing wall. "We measure the deflection, failure, and how hot it gets on the cool side," said Bausano. "That is an important issue because you don't want the fire to spread."

His findings are that the composite material being tested does localize heat, "especially compared to steel, which conducts heat in all directions."

His recommendation as other materials and processing are considered is, "Develop the material with as high a glass transition (Tg) temperature as you can in order to sustain structural rigidity. That would help the engineers and the sailors. The longer the material stays above Tg, or the softening point, the longer the wall will stand. Tg is the upper temperature level of usefulness."

Composite materials would also be useful on oil platforms, where fire is also a concern, he said.

Source: Virginia Tech

Explore further: Hoverbike drone project for air transport takes off

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Eco-pottery product from water treatment sludge

Jul 23, 2014

Sludge is a by-product of water treatment. Sludge is produced during the clarification and filtration process in the water treatment system. It is also produced from the accumulated solids removed from sedimentation ...

Fires in the Northern Territories July 2014

Jul 23, 2014

Environment Canada has issued a high health risk warning for Yellowknife and surrounding area because of heavy smoke in the region due to forest fires. In the image taken by the Aqua satellite, the smoke ...

Creating optical cables out of thin air

Jul 22, 2014

Imagine being able to instantaneously run an optical cable or fiber to any point on earth, or even into space. That's what Howard Milchberg, professor of physics and electrical and computer engineering at ...

Fermi finds a 'transformer' pulsar

Jul 22, 2014

(Phys.org) —In late June 2013, an exceptional binary containing a rapidly spinning neutron star underwent a dramatic change in behavior never before observed. The pulsar's radio beacon vanished, while at ...

Recommended for you

Hoverbike drone project for air transport takes off

10 hours ago

What happens when you cross a helicopter with a motorbike? The crew at Malloy Aeronautics has been focused on a viable answer and has launched a crowdfunding campaign to support its Hoverbike project, "The ...

Study shows role of media in sharing life events

11 hours ago

To share is human. And the means to share personal news—good and bad—have exploded over the last decade, particularly social media and texting. But until now, all research about what is known as "social sharing," or the ...

User comments : 0