Right whale newborn found on Fla. beach

Jan 28, 2008

Researchers are looking for the reason a newborn North Atlantic right whale with umbilical cord still attached washed up on a Florida beach.

State wildlife officials loaded the 15-foot-long carcass weighing more than 1,500 pounds onto a trailer and took it to the University of Florida's College of Veterinary Medicine to determine the cause of death Saturday, the South Fla. Sun-Sentinel reported.

Right whales, which got their name because they were particularly easy and profitable to hunt, hover close to extinction with a worldwide population of about 300, the newspaper said. Researchers said they hope clues from the carcass's necropsy will aid conservation efforts.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Tissue regeneration using anti-inflammatory nanomolecules

28 minutes ago

Anyone who has suffered an injury can probably remember the after-effects, including pain, swelling or redness. These are signs that the body is fighting back against the injury. When tissue in the body is damaged, biological ...

NASA sees Tropical Storm Karina get a boost

32 minutes ago

NASA's TRMM satellite saw Tropical Storm Karina get a boost on August 22 in the form of some moderate rainfall and towering thunderstorms in the center of the storm.

C2D2 fighting corrosion

34 minutes ago

Bridges become an infrastructure problem as they get older, as de-icing salt and carbon dioxide gradually destroy the reinforced concrete. A new robot can now check the condition of these structures, even ...

Recommended for you

New study charts the global invasion of crop pests

2 hours ago

Many of the world's most important crop-producing countries will be fully saturated with pests by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a new study led by the University of Exeter.

Zambia lifts ban on safari hunting

4 hours ago

Zambia has lifted a 20-month ban on safari hunting because it has lost too much revenue, but lions and leopards will remain protected, the government said Wednesday.

Wolves susceptible to yawn contagion

7 hours ago

Wolves may be susceptible to yawn contagion, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Teresa Romero from The University of Tokyo, Japan, and colleagues.

User comments : 0