Warming trend may result in malaria's rise

Mar 22, 2006

Recent research by University of Michigan scientists finds global warming might be contributing to a resurgence of malaria in the East African Highlands.

The finding contradicts that of a widely-cited study published a few years ago. But University of Michigan Theoretical Ecologist Mercedes Pascual finds that, while other factors such as drug and pesticide resistance, changing land use patterns and human migration also may play roles, climate change cannot be eliminated as a cause.

"Our results do not mean that temperature is the only or the main factor driving the increase in malaria, but that it is one of many factors that should be considered," Pascual said.

The study is to be published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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