Briefs: Tax filing online better than an MP3?

Mar 21, 2006

Americans would rather give up their MP3 players than forfeit the ability to file taxes online, an AT&T survey found.

The telecommunications giant said that 68 percent of respondents said they would rather give up their digital music player before the ability to file taxes on high-speed Internet connection.

Meanwhile, 82 percent of those polled said that speed was the greatest asset of filing taxes online rather than filling out a paper form. Some 36 percent of those surveyed said that they liked being able to get their refunds sooner, as is the case when filing online.

The survey was sponsored by AT&T to highlight how broadband Internet access has an impact on filing tax returns. The findings are based on a national online survey of 1,018 adults older than 18 conducted from Feb. 28 to March 5.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: US official: Auto safety agency under review

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Activist investor pushes Yahoo to buy rival AOL

Sep 26, 2014

(AP)—Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer is getting some unsolicited advice on how to turn around the long-struggling Internet company, just like some of her predecessors who tangled with investors dissatisfied with ...

States debate digital currency

Aug 01, 2014

Now that consumers can use digital currencies like bitcoin to buy rugs from Overstock.com, pay for Peruvian pork sandwiches from a food truck in Washington, D.C., and even make donations to political action committees, states ...

Open data is open for business

Jun 12, 2014

Last month, Web designer Sean Wittmeyer and colleague Wojciech Magda walked away with a $25,000 prize from the state of Colorado for designing an online tool to help businesses decide where to locate in the state.

Media shock stories about GameOver Zeus are not helpful

Jun 06, 2014

We need to watch out for headlines like the ones earlier this week warning that people had two weeks to protect themselves from a "powerful computer attack". It can end up scaring people who have little idea ...

Recommended for you

Microsoft beefs up security protection in Windows 10

8 hours ago

What Microsoft users in business care deeply about—-a system architecture that supports efforts to get their work done efficiently; a work-centric menu to quickly access projects rather than weather readings ...

US official: Auto safety agency under review

21 hours ago

Transportation officials are reviewing the "safety culture" of the U.S. agency that oversees auto recalls, a senior Obama administration official said Friday. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has been criticized ...

Out-of-patience investors sell off Amazon

21 hours ago

Amazon has long acted like an ideal customer on its own website: a freewheeling big spender with no worries about balancing a checkbook. Investors confident in founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' invest-and-expand ...

Ebola.com domain sold for big payout

21 hours ago

The owners of the website Ebola.com have scored a big payday with the outbreak of the epidemic, selling the domain for more than $200,000 in cash and stock.

Hacker gets prison for cyberattack stealing $9.4M

Oct 24, 2014

An Estonian man who pleaded guilty to orchestrating a 2008 cyberattack on a credit card processing company that enabled hackers to steal $9.4 million has been sentenced to 11 years in prison by a federal judge in Atlanta.

Magic Leap moves beyond older lines of VR

Oct 24, 2014

Two messages from Magic Leap: Most of us know that a world with dragons and unicorns, elves and fairies is just a better world. The other message: Technology can be mindboggingly awesome. When the two ...

User comments : 0