Stillborn rhino delivered in Cincinnati

Jan 07, 2008

A female rhinoceros calf was delivered stillborn this weekend at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, a report said Sunday.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reported Nikki, the zoo's 3,600-pound Indian rhinoceros mother, gave birth to the stillborn calf Saturday night, representing a devastating blow to the zoo and everyone involved.

Dr. Terri Roth, director of the Center for the Research of Endangered Wildlife, said zoo officials were unsuccessful in their efforts to revive the calf.

The calf was part of the zoo's fertilization program that uses artificial insemination to increase highly endangered species. With only 2,000 Indian rhinoceros left in the world, Roth told the Enquirer the loss of the calf was a significant setback.

"This is devastating news, but it won't change our program. We'll try again as soon as Nikki has some time off," Roth said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

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