Stillborn rhino delivered in Cincinnati

Jan 07, 2008

A female rhinoceros calf was delivered stillborn this weekend at the Cincinnati Zoo and Botanical Garden, a report said Sunday.

The Cincinnati Enquirer reported Nikki, the zoo's 3,600-pound Indian rhinoceros mother, gave birth to the stillborn calf Saturday night, representing a devastating blow to the zoo and everyone involved.

Dr. Terri Roth, director of the Center for the Research of Endangered Wildlife, said zoo officials were unsuccessful in their efforts to revive the calf.

The calf was part of the zoo's fertilization program that uses artificial insemination to increase highly endangered species. With only 2,000 Indian rhinoceros left in the world, Roth told the Enquirer the loss of the calf was a significant setback.

"This is devastating news, but it won't change our program. We'll try again as soon as Nikki has some time off," Roth said.

Copyright 2008 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers find the genome of the cultivated sweet potato has bacterial DNA

Related Stories

Microalgae used for green asphalt

1 hour ago

Microalgae offer a highly promising alternative to petroleum products without competing for resources used in the food industry. They have now been used for the first time to make asphalt. Researchers have ...

Electron trapping harnessed to make light sensors

1 hour ago

Traps. Whether you're squaring off against the Empire or trying to wring electricity out of sunlight, they're almost never a good thing. But sometimes you can turn that trap to your advantage. A team from ...

Giant magnetic effects induced in hybrid materials

1 hour ago

Proximity effects in hybrid heterostructures, which contain distinct layers of different materials, allow one material species to reveal and/or control properties of a dissimilar species. Specifically, for ...

Recommended for you

Killer bees test a double win for Australian honeybees

3 hours ago

A genetic test that can prevent the entry of 'killer' bees into Australia and worldwide spread has been created by researchers at the University of Sydney and their collaborators at York University in Canada.

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.