NASA Scans Ivan Inside for 3D Image

Sep 16, 2004
NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15

On the morning of September 15, 2004, NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite captured a 3-D look inside Hurricane Ivan, still a Category 4 storm. This unique look at Ivan shows the structure of rainfall inside the storm where red represents precipitation of 2 or more inches per hour. NASA scientists are watching the tall spires or "hot towers" inside the storm for clues about intensity fluctuations as Ivan approaches landfall. Ivan will be the third major hurricane to make landfall in the U.S. while another tropical storm, Jeanne, waits in the wings.

The above image from the NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15, 2004. Blue = 0.25 inches/hour, green = 0.50 inches/hour, yellow = 1.00 inches/hour, and red = 2.00+ inches/hour. Credit: NASA/NASDA.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15

The above image from the NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15, 2004. Blue = 0.25 inches/hour, green = 0.50 inches/hour, yellow = 1.00 inches/hour, and red = 2.00+ inches/hour. Credit: NASA/NASDA.

NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15

The above image from the NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite scanned Hurricane Ivan in the Gulf of Mexico Wednesday, September 15, 2004. Blue = 0.25 inches/hour, green = 0.50 inches/hour, yellow = 1.00 inches/hour, and red = 2.00+ inches/hour. High Resolution Image Credit: NASA/NASDA.

Source: NASA

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