ICO comm satellite to launch in May 2007

Mar 16, 2006

International Launch Services will use an Atlas rocket to send ICO North America's new communications satellite into space.

Liftoff of the Mobile Satellite Service spacecraft will take place at Cape Canaveral, Fla., at the end of May 2007, ILS said Thursday.

Once in its geostationary orbit, the bird will handle ICO's wireless voice, data and Internet services in North America.

The 2 Gigahertz Hybrid Satellite/Terrestrial MSS system will utilize a handset similar to a cell phone and will be offered to the security and public safety industry. The service is slated to go operational in July 2007.

The satellite itself is being built by Loral and has received the necessary Federal Communications Commission certifications.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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