Four dolphins found dead on Florida beach

Dec 14, 2007

Researchers are examining four dead dolphins that washed ashore on Florida's Canaveral National Seashore.

Biologist Megan Stolen of the Hubbs-SeaWorld Research Institute said the dolphins may have been killed by toxins from a red tide bloom off Florida's Atlantic Coast, The Orlando Sentinel said Thursday.

Red tide has also killed about a dozen green sea turtles during the past few weeks in Brevard County, WKMG-TV (Orlando) reported.

Red tide is suspected to have killed more than 700 dolphins in Florida in 1987 and 100 dolphins in Florida's Panhandle in 2004.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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