First stem cells injected into brains

Mar 11, 2006

A clinical trial in Oregon will explore the safety of injecting human stem cells directly into the brain to treat fatal pediatric neurodegenerative disorder.

The groundbreaking trial at Doernbecher Children's Hospital at Oregon Health & Science University will test whether HuCNS-SC(TM), a proprietary human central nervous stem cell product is safe, and whether it can slow the progression of two forms of devastating illness known as Batten disease, according to StemCells, Inc. of Palo Alto, Calif.

"While the preclinical research in the laboratory and in animals is promising, it is important to note that this is a safety trial and, to our knowledge, purified neural stem cell transplantation has never been done before," said Robert D. Steiner, vice chairman of pediatric research and the study's principal investigator.

"It is our hope that stem cells will provide an important therapeutic advance for these children who have no other viable options," Steiner said.

Up to six children from Oregon or around the country will undergo transplantation at Doernbecher. StemCells, Inc. received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in October 2005.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Freedom and responsibility of science

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Heading circulatory disease off at the pass

Jul 17, 2008

Researchers at Oregon Health & Science University have devised an ultrasound imaging technique that picks up subtle early evidence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) that current conventional tests miss.

Recommended for you

Fossil arthropod went on the hunt for its prey

8 hours ago

A new species of carnivorous crustacean has been identified, which roamed the seas 435 million years ago, grasping its prey with spiny limbs before devouring it. The fossil is described and details of its lifestyle are published ...

User comments : 0