'Killer bees' arrive early in Tucson

Mar 09, 2006

So-called killer bees have reportedly arrived in Tucson, Ariz., early this year, with a shortage of food on the desert causing colonies to move about.

The Africanized bees have been forming new colonies around the city since at least February, while that activity doesn't usually begin until the middle or end of March, the Arizona Daily Star reported Thursday.

Scientists believe the ongoing drought over the southwester United States has reduced the amount of food available for existing urban colonies or in the desert where many of the bees normally live.

"The bees are kind of confused," said Justin Schmidt, a research biologist and Africanized bee expert, told the newspaper. "Normally, in January and early March, there will be lots of flowers from early rains in the desert -- mesquite, mustard and mistletoe -- that provide good food for them.

"This year we haven't had any of that. You walk around in the desert and there are no flowers. The bees are kind of starving," he added.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Research geared to keep women from fleeing IT profession

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Telefonica ups bid to create Brazil's top operator

1 hour ago

Spain's telecommunications company Telefonica has raised its offer to buy Brazilian operator Global Village Telecom, or GVT, from French media conglomerate Vivendi to 7.45 billion euros ($9.82 billion) from 6.7 billion euros ...

Recommended for you

Orphaned children can do just as well in institutions

17 hours ago

The removal of institutions or group homes will not lead to better child well-being and could even worsen outcomes for some orphaned and separated children, according to new findings from a three-year study across five low- ...

Bronze Age wine cellar found

17 hours ago

A Bronze Age palace excavation reveals an ancient wine cellar, according to a study published August 27, 2014 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Andrew Koh from Brandeis University and colleagues.

User comments : 0