Britain may reintroduce wolf and lynx

Dec 01, 2007

A British wildlife group says wolf, lynx, beaver and wild boar could be brought back to live in the wild without posing a threat to people or the environment.

The Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at Oxford University said the animals, which were hunted to extinction in the 18th century, would enhance the environment and could create a new tourist industry, The Telegraph newspaper said Friday.

An Aberdeen University study has identified two areas in Scotland that would provide suitable habitat for lynx. The report estimated that current deer populations could support 400 lynx in the Highlands and 50 in the southern Uplands.

Scotland also has areas suitable for reintroduction of the wolf, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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vivcollins
not rated yet Dec 01, 2007
interesting headline bringing back Beaver in the UK

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