Britain may reintroduce wolf and lynx

Dec 01, 2007

A British wildlife group says wolf, lynx, beaver and wild boar could be brought back to live in the wild without posing a threat to people or the environment.

The Wildlife Conservation Research Unit at Oxford University said the animals, which were hunted to extinction in the 18th century, would enhance the environment and could create a new tourist industry, The Telegraph newspaper said Friday.

An Aberdeen University study has identified two areas in Scotland that would provide suitable habitat for lynx. The report estimated that current deer populations could support 400 lynx in the Highlands and 50 in the southern Uplands.

Scotland also has areas suitable for reintroduction of the wolf, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Spider personality study shows evidence of 'social niche specialization'

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New paper calls for more carbon capture and storage research

16 minutes ago

Federal efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions must involve increased investment in research and development of carbon capture and storage technologies, according to a new paper published by the University of Wyoming's ...

How computing is transforming materials science research

6 minutes ago

In the United States, the start of 2014 marked the end of an era—the "death" of incandescent light bulbs. Not that all 40- and 60-watt incandescent light bulbs simultaneously stopped working on January ...

DESY and IBM develop big data architecture for science

26 minutes ago

IBM today announced it is collaborating with Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), a leading national research center in Germany, to speed up management and storage of massive volumes of x-ray data. The ...

Recommended for you

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

vivcollins
not rated yet Dec 01, 2007
interesting headline bringing back Beaver in the UK