Officials in Bahamas rule out bird flu

Mar 05, 2006

Officials in the Bahamas said 10 birds that some believed to have died from bird flu could not be tested for the virus.

All the carcasses were in an advanced state of decomposition, so no definitive diagnosis could be made and no useful samples of internal organs could be recovered for testing.

Physical evidence indicated the likely causes of death may have been trauma, said a senior veterinary officer of the Ministry of Agriculture.

There have been reports of hunting for migratory ducks taking place in the area where the carcasses were found.

There have been no new reports of mortality or illness in either wild or domesticated birds on the island of Inagua.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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