Better Los Alamos monitoring urged

Mar 04, 2006

A geologist says new monitoring wells and an independent company should monitor the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico for contamination.

Bob Gilkeson told the Concerned Citizens for Nuclear Safety Thursday that 14 of the lab's 33 wells can't properly detect pollution because they had not been installed properly and had drilling additives like bentonite clay, which can conceal contamination, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported Friday.

"The specter of problems with this work over the last 10 years is very large," Gilkeson said.

Los Alamos Lab spokeswoman Kathy DeLucas said the lab has been cooperating with the state Environment Department, the public and the National Nuclear Security Administration "to characterize the groundwater and develop a path forward" for the wells.

"We've been listening to their concerns about the validity of the data, and we are developing a comprehensive and aggressive plan to review the data and address the concerns in a well-rehabilitation effort," she said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Type Ia supernovae stem from the explosion of white dwarfs coupled with twin stars

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Students see world from station crew's point of view

22 hours ago

NASA is helping students examine their home planet from space without ever leaving the ground, giving them a global perspective by going beyond a map attached to a sphere on a pedestal. The Sally Ride Earth ...

Exoplanet measured with remarkable precision

22 hours ago

Barely 30 years ago, the only planets astronomers had found were located right here in our own solar system. The Milky Way is chock-full of stars, millions of them similar to our own sun. Yet the tally ...

New star catalog reveals unexpected 'solar salad'

23 hours ago

(Phys.org) —An Arizona State University alumnus has devised the largest catalog ever produced for stellar compositions. Called the Hypatia Catalog, after one of the first female astronomers who lived in ...

Mars deep down

Aug 19, 2014

Scarring the southern highlands of Mars is one of the Solar System's largest impact basins: Hellas, with a diameter of 2300 km and a depth of over 7 km.

User comments : 0