Group: Don't rebury Hawaiian artifacts

Mar 02, 2006

Artifacts found in a Hawaiian lava tube should be put on display and studied, not buried, a group of native Hawaiians said Thursday.

The artifacts were found in January by a pair of brothers who were hired to assess the safety of a cave 3 miles north of Kailua-Kona.

"These are treasures of our kupuna (ancestors) that should be shared," William Hoohuli, 64, told the Honolulu Star-Bulletin. He said his family has lived in the area of the cave for nearly three centuries.

Hoohuli and his brother were hired by Rutter Development Corp. to inspect the cave as part of an assessment being done in advance of construction of a 500-home golf course complex.

Hoohuli and supporters suggest the cave might have been a storage area or a secret place of worship established after Chiefess Kaahumanu outlawed the Hawaiian religion in 1820.

"Different people have told me that we should bury them because they are not for us or for our eyes," Hoohuli told the newspaper. "I feel differently. If the kupuna hadn't wanted us to see it, they would have destroyed it already. They wouldn't have left it. When it was discovered, it was time for them to reveal themselves."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Android gains in US, basic phones almost extinct

2 hours ago

The Google Android platform grabbed the majority of mobile phones in the US market in early 2014, as consumers all but abandoned non-smartphone handsets, a survey showed Friday.

Quest for extraterrestrial life not over, experts say

2 hours ago

The discovery of an Earth-sized planet in the "habitable" zone of a distant star, though exciting, is still a long way from pointing to the existence of extraterrestrial life, experts said Friday. ...

Recommended for you

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

18 hours ago

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Study finds law dramatically curbing need for speed

Apr 18, 2014

Almost seven years have passed since Ontario's street-racing legislation hit the books and, according to one Western researcher, it has succeeded in putting the brakes on the number of convictions and, more importantly, injuries ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Egypt archaeologists find ancient writer's tomb

Egypt's minister of antiquities says a team of Spanish archaeologists has discovered two tombs in the southern part of the country, one of them belonging to a writer and containing a trove of artifacts including reed pens ...

Easter morning delivery for space station

Space station astronauts got a special Easter treat: a cargo ship full of supplies. The shipment arrived Sunday morning via the SpaceX company's Dragon cargo capsule.

Hackers of Oman news agency target Bouteflika

Hackers on Sunday targeted the website of Oman's official news agency, singling out and mocking Algeria's newly re-elected president Abdelaziz Bouteflika as a handicapped "dictator".

NASA's space station Robonaut finally getting legs

Robonaut, the first out-of-this-world humanoid, is finally getting its space legs. For three years, Robonaut has had to manage from the waist up. This new pair of legs means the experimental robot—now stuck ...