Cassini Attempts 12th Titan Flyby

Feb 28, 2006

NASA's Cassini spacecraft returns to Titan on Monday for its twelfth flyby since beginning to survey Saturn and its moons on July 4, 2004.

Cassini will reach its closest point of approach at about 2:48 a.m. Pacific Time, when it will fly past Saturn's largest moon at an altitude of 1,813 kilometers (1,126 miles) above the surface at a speed of 6.0 kilometers per second (13,200 miles per hour).

The navigation team at Jet Propulsion Laboratory said it expects to deliver the spacecraft within 30 kilometers (19.2 miles) of its target altitude at a confidence of 99 percent.

Copyright 2006 by Space Daily, Distributed United Press International

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