Giant squid displayed in London

Feb 28, 2006

One of the largest giant squids ever found is on display at London's Natural History Museum.

The 28-foot squid was caught off the coast of the Falkland Islands by a trawler. It is on display in a 30-foot-long glass tank filled with a liquid preservative.

Giant squid, once thought to be sea serpents, are very rarely seen and live at depths of 656-3,281 feet, the BBC reported. Weighing up to 2,200 pounds, the largest squid ever seen measured 59 feet.

It took several months to prepare the squid for display.

Museum officials told the BBC they nicknamed the squid "Archie," from its Latin name Architeuthis dux. But they say they might have to revise the name since they now believe the creature is probably a female.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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