Founder of creationism dies

Feb 28, 2006

The man regarded as the founder of the creationist movement, Henry M. Morris, has died in California at age 87.

The Baptist Press reports Morris died Saturday following a series of small strokes at a San Diego-area convalescent hospital.

Morris, who founded the Institute for Creation Research in 1970 and while a professor of civil engineering at Virginia Tech, wrote "The Genesis Flood" in 1961. He also wrote "Scientific Creationism" (1974); "The Genesis Record" (1976), "That You Might Believe" (1978); "What Is Creation Science?" (with Gary Parker, 1982); "Men of Science; Men of God" (1982); "History of Modern Creationism" (1984); "The Long War Against God" (1989); and "Biblical Creationism" (1993).

Morris espoused the theory the Earth is only a few thousand years old, not the millions believed by most scientists.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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