China looks into 'extinct' tiger sightings

Oct 27, 2007

Chinese officials plan to organize an expedition to investigate claims of "extinct" tigers in China's northwest Shaanxi province.

A State Forestry Administration official told Xinhua, "We are organizing a team but forestry investigation is a complicated task and we are still making specific plains, including selecting experts."

The South China tiger reports gained attention after a farmer in northwest China purportedly captured a photograph of the tiger. Local officials authenticated the photograph.

Forestry officials banned hunting in the area and set up checkpoints to prevent unauthorized access to the area to protect the tiger's habitat.

The South China tiger is believed to have gone extinct 30 years ago.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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