World's hottest chile pepper discovered

Oct 26, 2007
World's hottest chile pepper discovered
Fruits of Bhut Jolokia on plants grown in the field at the Leyendecker Plant Science Research Center. Credit: Paul Bosland

Researchers at New Mexico State University recently discovered the world’s hottest chile pepper.

Bhut Jolokia, a variety of chile pepper originating in Assam, India, has earned Guiness World Records’ recognition as the world’s hottest chile pepper by blasting past the previous champion Red Savina. In replicated tests of Scoville heat units (SHUs), Bhut Jolokia reached one million SHUs, almost double the SHUs of Red Savina, which measured a mere 577,000.

Dr. Paul Bosland, Director of the Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University’s Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences collected seeds of Bhut Jolokia while visiting India in 2001. Bosland grew Bhut Jolokia plants under insect-proof cages for three years to produce enough seed to complete the required field tests.

“The name Bhut Jolokia translates as ‘ghost chile,’” Bosland said, “I think it’s because the chile is so hot, you give up the ghost when you eat it!” Bosland added that the intense heat concentration of Bhut Jolokia could have significant impact on the food industry as an economical seasoning in packaged foods.

The complete study and abstract are available on the ASHS HortScience electronic journal web site: hortsci.ashspublications.org/c… nt/abstract/42/2/222

Source: American Society for Horticultural Science

Explore further: Study characterizes genetic resistance to wheat disease

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Motor proteins prefer slow, steady movement

37 minutes ago

takes at least two motor proteins to tango, according to Rice University scientists who discovered the workhorses that move cargo in cells are highly sensitive to the proximity of their peers.

Retracing the roots of fungal symbioses

44 minutes ago

With apologies to the poet John Donne, and based on recent work from the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (DOE JGI), a DOE Office of Science user facility, it can be said that no plant is ...

Recommended for you

Living in the genetic comfort zone

7 hours ago

The information encoded in the DNA of an organism is not sufficient to determine the expression pattern of genes. This fact has been known even before the discovery of epigenetics, which refers to external ...

Cats put sight over smell in finding food

9 hours ago

Cats may prefer to use their eyes rather than follow their nose when it comes to finding the location of food, according to new research by leading animal behaviourists.

Feds spot third baby orca born recently to imperiled pods

10 hours ago

(AP)—U.S. scientists following endangered killer whales from a research vessel have spotted a baby orca off the coast of Washington state, the third birth documented this winter but still leaving the population ...

Malaria transmission linked to mosquitoes' sexual biology

11 hours ago

Sexual biology may be the key to uncovering why Anopheles mosquitoes are unique in their ability to transmit malaria to humans, according to researchers at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health and University of Per ...

User comments : 2

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

vlam67
1.5 / 5 (2) Oct 26, 2007
Trust Christopher Columbus to name it chile pepper. Not surprisingly since he thought he discovered Asia. Pepper is pepper, chili is chili, the two has NOTHING in common. Not even the taste!
shyataroo
not rated yet Oct 26, 2007
I would like to point out that the Naga Dorset is hotter, at 1,598,227 SHU (scoville heat units)
http://www.bbc.co...46.shtml

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.