EPA panel's recommendations are ignored

Feb 27, 2006

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is, for the first time, ignoring recommendations from its Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee.

Instead, the EPA is implementing relaxed rules governing how much soot and dust can be permitted in the air from agriculture and mining, The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported Monday.

The air pollution dispute and other recent clashes highlight what scientists contend is their increasingly diminished role in policy to protect public health and the environment under the Bush administration.

"The purpose of this committee is to provide the best scientific advice available, and he didn't take it," said Committee Chairwoman Rogene Henderson, referring to EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson.

The committee is comprised of 22 members, including physicians, toxicologists, chemists and prominent researchers. The rejection of some of their conclusions troubles Henderson -- a Republican-appointed toxicologist from New Mexico who is in charge of assembling other scientific panels to help tailor air pollution rules.

"I have a concern about this demoralizing people," she told the Post-Dispatch. "These are very high-powered scientists, and they don't have a lot of time. But they make the time, because they believe that their work can make a difference."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: First potentially habitable Earth-sized planet confirmed: It may have liquid water

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

U.S. safe from Japan radiation, Berkeley lab expert says

Mar 23, 2011

Tom McKone, a senior staff scientist in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s (Berkeley Lab’s) Environmental Energy Technologies Division, is an expert on health-risk assessments associated with exposure to environmental ...

Recommended for you

Astronauts to reveal sobering data on asteroid impacts

2 hours ago

This Earth Day, Tuesday, April 22, three former NASA astronauts will present new evidence that our planet has experienced many more large-scale asteroid impacts over the past decade than previously thought… ...

Rosetta instrument commissioning continues

3 hours ago

We're now in week four of six dedicated to commissioning Rosetta's science instruments after the long hibernation period, with the majority now having completed at least a first initial switch on.

Astronaut salary

3 hours ago

Talk about a high-flying career! Being a government astronaut means you have the chance to go into space and take part in some neat projects—such as going on spacewalks, moving robotic arms and doing science ...

A sharp eye on Southern binary stars

4 hours ago

Unlike our sun, with its retinue of orbiting planets, many stars in the sky orbit around a second star. These binary stars, with orbital periods ranging from days to centuries, have long been the primary ...

Hubble image: A cross-section of the universe

4 hours ago

An image of a galaxy cluster taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope gives a remarkable cross-section of the Universe, showing objects at different distances and stages in cosmic history. They range ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

A sharp eye on Southern binary stars

Unlike our sun, with its retinue of orbiting planets, many stars in the sky orbit around a second star. These binary stars, with orbital periods ranging from days to centuries, have long been the primary ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...

Hubble image: A cross-section of the universe

An image of a galaxy cluster taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope gives a remarkable cross-section of the Universe, showing objects at different distances and stages in cosmic history. They range ...

Astronaut salary

Talk about a high-flying career! Being a government astronaut means you have the chance to go into space and take part in some neat projects—such as going on spacewalks, moving robotic arms and doing science ...

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...

Is Parkinson's an autoimmune disease?

The cause of neuronal death in Parkinson's disease is still unknown, but a new study proposes that neurons may be mistaken for foreign invaders and killed by the person's own immune system, similar to the ...