Giant flock of lapwings discovered

Oct 22, 2007

Conservationists in Turkey are celebrating the discovery of a previously unknown flock of sociable lapwings, once thought to be nearing extinction.

Researchers -- who previously thought there were only 400 breeding adults left -- were surprised to discover a flock of 3,200, The Times of London said Friday.

The birds were detected with a satellite tracker in Kazakhstan and followed to a remote area of Ceylanpinar in Turkey.

The tagged birds flew 2,000 miles to reach the Turkish feeding ground, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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