Study: SAT might predict life satisfaction

Feb 23, 2006

A Vanderbilt University study suggests the SAT -- a test many students take prior to college admission -- might be able to predict a person's success in life.

High school juniors and seniors across the nation in January took their SATs. The Vanderbilt research suggests the test may go far beyond predicting college success -- if taken during a person's early teens, it might foretell a person's post-college success and life satisfaction.

The study found high SAT scores at young ages can reveal individuals who have cognitive and creative potential for future success in such occupations as medicine, engineering and higher education.

The researchers say their study provides evidence that students who score in the top 0.01 percentile of their age group on the SAT before age 13 are more likely than a comparison group of graduate students to achieve a medical degree, earn an annual salary of at least $100,000, or secure a tenure-track position in a top-50 ranked institution.

The findings are reported in the March issue of Psychological Science.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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