California condors dying of lead poisoning

Oct 13, 2007

Scientists say California condors are ingesting deadly levels of lead by feasting on the carcasses of animals killed by hunters.

Biologists say they've seen a condor drop out of the sky dead from lead poisoning and have recorded blood lead concentrations 40 times the level considered toxic in humans, The Los Angeles Times reported Friday. The biologists say secondhand lead from bullets is the most persistent threat to the re-establishment of California condors in the wild.

A bill passed this summer by the California Legislature would ban lead ammunition in condor habitats, although it is unclear if Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger will sign it, the newspaper said.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Honey bees sting Texas man about 1,000 times

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Social Security spent $300M on 'IT boondoggle'

9 hours ago

(AP)—Six years ago the Social Security Administration embarked on an aggressive plan to replace outdated computer systems overwhelmed by a growing flood of disability claims.

Cheaper wireless plans cut into AT&T 2Q profit

9 hours ago

(AP)—AT&T posted lower net income for the latest quarter due to cheaper cellphone plans it introduced as a response to aggressive pricing from smaller competitor T-Mobile US.

Awarded a Pell Grant? Better double-check

9 hours ago

(AP)—Potentially tens of thousands of students awarded a Pell Grant or other need-based federal aid for the coming school year could find it taken away because of a mistake in filling out the form.

Recommended for you

Study indicates large raptors in Africa used for bushmeat

10 hours ago

Bushmeat, the use of native animal species for food or commercial food sale, has been heavily documented to be a significant factor in the decline of many species of primates and other mammals. However, a new study indicates ...

The microbes make the sake brewery

11 hours ago

A sake brewery has its own microbial terroir, meaning the microbial populations found on surfaces in the facility resemble those found in the product, creating the final flavor according to research published ahead of print ...

Fighting bacteria—with viruses

12 hours ago

Research published today in PLOS Pathogens reveals how viruses called bacteriophages destroy the bacterium Clostridium difficile (C. diff), which is becoming a serious problem in hospitals and healthcare institutes, due to its re ...

User comments : 1

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

bigwheel
not rated yet Oct 14, 2007
It's funny how the lead is traveling around in a dead animal. I thought when you died bloodflow stopped, how silly of me. Show
me the pellets and bullets that you are pulling out of these dead
condors or cut the crap, we're not idiots