The path more traveled seems longer

Feb 11, 2006

A Manchester University study may explain why a daily commute can seem to grow longer the more it is traveled.

Andrew Crompton had 140 architecture students estimate the distance from the university's student union building to familiar destinations along a straight road.

First-year students estimated the mile-long path to be about 1.24 miles on average, while third-year students estimated it to be 1.45 miles.

Another group of students were asked to estimate a 550-yard stretch along a cluttered tourist village in Portmeirion, Wales, and in Manchester. The village distance seemed further, because it was packed with more details for people to look at, Crompton found.

The findings were published on Nature News.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Researchers discover low-grade nonwoven cotton picks up 50 times own weight of oil

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

New material puts a twist in light

Jul 18, 2014

Scientists at The Australian National University (ANU) have uncovered the secret to twisting light at will. It is the latest step in the development of photonics, the faster, more compact and less carbon-hungry ...

Earthworm invasion: calling all citizen scientists

Jun 24, 2014

Interloping earthworms are wiggling and nibbling their way through northern soils, wreaking havoc on local ecosystems. It's an invasion that can be slowed only with help from citizen scientists and other ...

Artificial intelligence takes to the skies

Jun 04, 2014

As do other recreational pilots, Ashish Kapoor learned during flight training that he shouldn't count on the accuracy of wind forecasts. The best available forecasts in the United States—from the federal ...

Recommended for you

Soccer's key role in helping migrants to adjust

2 hours ago

New research from the University of Adelaide has for the first time detailed the important role the sport of soccer has played in helping migrants to adjust to their new lives in Australia.

How dinosaurs shrank, survived and evolved into birds

4 hours ago

That starling at your birdfeeder? It is a dinosaur. The chicken on your dinner plate? Also a dinosaur. That mangy seagull scavenging for chips on the beach? Apart from being disgusting, yet again it is a ...

Children's book explores Really Big Numbers

4 hours ago

A new children's book written and illustrated by a Brown mathematics professor Richard Schwartz takes readers on a visual journal through the infinite number system. Schwartz hopes Really Big Numbers will ...

User comments : 0