CIDETEC and IBM to Develop Nanomaterials for Microelectronic

Sep 07, 2004

The CIDETEC Technological Centre in Donostia-San Sebastián and the IBM Almaden Research Center of California have signed a joint working agreement in order to develop different kinds of nanomaterials applicable to the microelectronics industry. The agreement has an initial duration of two years, afrer which it can be revised periodically.

Within the framework of the agreement, advanced methods of polymerisation for the synthesis of new macromolecular architectures such as dendrimeres and polymeric nanoparticles will be investigated jointly. Interest in these arises from the need to develop new nanomaterials for the improvement of microelectronics and the development of nanoelectronics.

The agreement will involve an interchange of researchers from both bodies and the training and specialisation of Basque University researchers in the emerging field of Nanotechnology.

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