China hatches 150 African ostriches

Aug 27, 2007

Breeders have successfully hatched one batch of African ostriches in the County of Nileke, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

The successful breeding indicates that the African ostrich is adapted to the climate of the Nileke area, China's Xinhua News Agency reported.

The first batch included 150 eggs laid by 90 ostriches. The mountainous, grassy area of Nileke made it a great place to breed the ostrich, known as the world's largest bird.

Ostrich breeding in China is an aid program with an investment of 650,000 yuan, or $86,000, Xinhua reported.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Isotope study shows which urban ants love junk food

Related Stories

Italian olive tree disease stumps EU

8 hours ago

EU member states are divided on how to stop the spread of a disease affecting olive trees in Italy that could result in around a million being cut down, officials said Friday.

Festo has BionicANTs communicating by the rules for tasks

8 hours ago

Germany-based automation company Festo, focused on technologies for tasks, turns to nature for inspiration, trying to take the cues from how nature performs tasks so efficiently. "Whether it's energy efficiency, ...

Jury decides Silicon Valley firm did not discriminate

8 hours ago

A jury decided Friday that a prestigious venture capital firm did not discriminate or retaliate against a female employee in a case that shined a light on gender imbalance and working conditions for women ...

Intel in talks with Altera on tie-up

8 hours ago

US tech giant Intel is in talks with rival Altera on a tie-up to broaden the chipmaker's product line amid growth in Internet-connected devices, the Wall Street Journal reported Friday.

Recommended for you

Isotope study shows which urban ants love junk food

35 minutes ago

Research from North Carolina State University finds that some - but not all - of the ant species on the streets of Manhattan have developed a taste for human food, offering insight into why certain ants are ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.