China hatches 150 African ostriches

Aug 27, 2007

Breeders have successfully hatched one batch of African ostriches in the County of Nileke, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region.

The successful breeding indicates that the African ostrich is adapted to the climate of the Nileke area, China's Xinhua News Agency reported.

The first batch included 150 eggs laid by 90 ostriches. The mountainous, grassy area of Nileke made it a great place to breed the ostrich, known as the world's largest bird.

Ostrich breeding in China is an aid program with an investment of 650,000 yuan, or $86,000, Xinhua reported.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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