New Zealand's broadcast demand doubles

Feb 02, 2006

New Zealand's Telecom said its number of household broadband subscribers more than doubled in 2005 from a year ago.

The carrier said that the number of users reached 279,000, considerably higher than its forecast of 250,000 at the beginning of the year.

"With broadband from Telecom added to the broadband supplied by other companies on their own networks, more than 300,000 Kiwi households are now on broadband -- which is more than one in five of all households," Telecom Chief Executive Theresa Gattung said in a news release.

"Broadband growth in New Zealand is now outstripping the OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) average. Customers at home are paying prices that are 6th best in the OECD, the Ministry of Economic Development's December benchmarking study reported. ... We also see prices for business broadband coming down, as they have in other areas," she added.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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