Freescale creates first commercially viable GaAs MOSFET device

Jan 30, 2006

Freescale Semiconductor has developed the industry's first device that combines the high performance of gallium arsenide (GaAs) semiconductor compounds with the advantages of traditional metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) technology and its scaling laws.

Freescale's breakthrough enables the development of new classes of power amplifier and low-power, ultra-fast semiconductors that significantly shrink the size and boost the performance of end devices. The performance improvements could fundamentally change analog-to-digital conversion technology, potentially making such conversions virtually instantaneous.

"Freescale's GaAs MOSFET technology holds the promise of having a disruptive impact in the industry," said Asif Anwar, GaAs Services director for Strategy Analytics. "It offers potential leaps in device performance built upon a bedrock of mature manufacturing capabilities."

Silicon-based MOSFET technology forms the bedrock of CMOS, which is the most widely used microelectronic design process and is found in virtually every electronic product. Prior to Freescale's breakthrough, fundamental scientific limitations prevented the application of industry standard MOSFET processes, equipment, and interconnect methods in GaAs, which is a material that generates less noise and conducts electrons up to 20 times faster than traditional silicon.

The industry's previous inability to deploy silicon dioxide or other dielectric materials into GaAs device technologies had prohibited the incorporation of metal oxide gate structures that are critical to the creation of viable GaAs-based MOSFET devices. Freescale has identified GaAs-compatible materials and devices that provide scaling capabilities on par with traditional silicon materials. This eliminates oxide-semiconductor interface defect issues that had discouraged the creation of high performance MOSFET devices based on GaAs compounds in the past.

"This remarkable achievement overturns industry assumptions and has the potential to fundamentally change the way high performance semiconductors are designed, manufactured and deployed," said Sumit Sadana, senior vice president of Strategy and Business Development and acting chief technology officer for Freescale. "This breakthrough demonstrates Freescale's relentless commitment to technology innovation."

Freescale anticipates that early generations of GaAs-based MOSFET devices will be highly specialized and designed to complement traditional semiconductor technology. Freescale will accelerate deployment of the technology by collaborating with partners focused on creating infrastructure, wireless and optoelectronic products requiring extreme computing performance.

Source: Freescale Semiconductor

Explore further: Turkey still hopes Twitter will open local office

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Hand out money with my mobile? I think I'm ready

2 hours ago

A service is soon to launch in the UK that will enable us to transfer money to other people using just their name and mobile number. Paym is being hailed as a revolution in banking because you can pay peopl ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Tiny power plants hold promise for nuclear energy

Small underground nuclear power plants that could be cheaper to build than their behemoth counterparts may herald the future for an energy industry under intense scrutiny since the Fukushima disaster, the ...

Clean air: Fewer sources for self-cleaning

Up to now, HONO, also known as nitrous acid, was considered one of the most important sources of hydroxyl radicals (OH), which are regarded as the detergent of the atmosphere, allowing the air to clean itself. ...

Turning off depression in the brain

Scientists have traced vulnerability to depression-like behaviors in mice to out-of-balance electrical activity inside neurons of the brain's reward circuit and experimentally reversed it – but there's ...