Briefs: China wireless users to reach 440 million

Jan 30, 2006

China predicted Monday that the nation's number of wireless telephone subscribers would reach 440 million this year.

The Information Industry Ministry expected another 48 million Chinese to join the subscriber rolls, giving about one-third of China's population access to a cell phone, the Xinhua news agency reported.

Last year more than 58 million Chinese subscribed to wireless service.

The growth rate will mean continued good times for the telecom industry in China, one of the world's key markets, with 2006 revenues expected to climb 10 percent to 700 billion yuan ($87.5 billion), Xinhua said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

China's surging appetite for 3G

Mar 08, 2006

With more than 10 million potential subscribers of third-generation mobile phones at the ready, China seems ready to continue shaping its role as a powerful force in the adoption of new technologies and innovations.

Recommended for you

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

9 hours ago

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

User comments : 0

More news stories

Hackathon team's GoogolPlex gives Siri extra powers

(Phys.org) —Four freshmen at the University of Pennsylvania have taken Apple's personal assistant Siri to behave as a graduate-level executive assistant which, when asked, is capable of adjusting the temperature ...

Better thermal-imaging lens from waste sulfur

Sulfur left over from refining fossil fuels can be transformed into cheap, lightweight, plastic lenses for infrared devices, including night-vision goggles, a University of Arizona-led international team ...

Cosmologists weigh cosmic filaments and voids

(Phys.org) —Cosmologists have established that much of the stuff of the universe is made of dark matter, a mysterious, invisible substance that can't be directly detected but which exerts a gravitational ...