Remarkable journeys may save bat species

Jul 12, 2007

Researchers have new hope for the future of an endangered species of bat after two of the flying mammals traveled 110 miles to a Welsh cave to live.

While two members of the Greater Horseshoe bat species initially resided in the British county of Gloucestershire, both animals traveled 110 miles, years apart, to recently find themselves together in a cave in northern Wales, The Telegraph said Wednesday.

Bat researcher David Priddis said while the chance the bats somehow initiated the remarkable reunion appears slim, one cannot overlook the animals' amazing abilities.

"It is not too far-fetched to say they found each other because bats have very complicated, sophisticated sonar systems way above our hearing and the Greater Horseshoe's is higher than most," Priddis said.

Priddis added that while the winged animals have since begun cohabitating in the cave in Wales' Conwy Valley, the female bat's young age will delay any potential mating with her male counterpart.

Nonetheless, experts are encouraged by a potential mating pair of the bats, whose species has grown endangered throughout most of Britain.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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