Fears of eagle injury from wind farm

Jan 28, 2006

The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds fears wind farms may harm newly thriving white-tailed eagles in Scotland.

After a 30-year re-introduction project in Scotland the white-tailed eagles have been thriving, but the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds in Scotland is fighting plans for a proposed 234-turbine wind farm on north Lewis.

Four eagles have been found to have been killed by the turbines -- two were split in half -- and 30 more have failed to return to their nesting sites within the wind farm area on Smola, a set of isolated islands in Norway, the Daily Telegraph reported Saturday.

"The news from Norway is of great concern to us," said Stuart Housden, director of RSPB in Scotland. "If white-tailed eagles have died because of wind turbine collisions there are major implications for our own eagle populations here in Scotland."

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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