Woman gets six severed fingers sewed back

Jan 28, 2006

Surgeons in Britain successfully sewed back on six severed fingers of a 62-year-old woman injured in an accident in a biscuit factory.

Anne Kellow was taken 60 miles to Derriford Hospital in Plymouth, England, where a team led by plastic surgeon Hischam Taha sewed back the fingers during 17 hours of microsurgery, the Daily Telegraph reported Friday.

"It is amazing, I feared I had lost my hands, but they managed to repair them. I'm so grateful," Kellow said. "At first I was completely traumatized, but everything happened so quickly that with the help of the hospital staff I have been able to make sure I see it through."

Paramedics who responded to the accident collected the severed fingers, packed them in ice and took them with Kellow in the ambulance.

"It is exactly two weeks since the operation and we are very pleased with the results so far," Taha said.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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