Recuperated rare fish released in China

Jun 18, 2007

Wildlife officials in China released a rare paddlefish into Yangtze River Sunday after nursing it back to health from injuries inflicted by fishermen.

An official at the Shanghai Chinese Paddlefish Nature Reserve said the fish suffered significant injuries while being caught by fishermen in the river Jan. 18, but had recuperated enough to be allowed back into the wild, China's official Xinhua news agency said.

The fish, which received emergency treatment as part of its recovery, is a member of a nearly extinct species protected under Chinese law.

In an apparent attempt to increase the species' numbers, wildlife officials Sunday released 150 artificially bred paddlefish into the Yangtze, as well.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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