Deadly frog fungus found in Japan

Jun 13, 2007

A deadly parasitic fungus that has been killing frogs around the world has has been found in wild frogs in Japan for the first time.

The chytrid fungus was first detected in captive imported frogs, Kyodo news service said Tuesday.

Researchers from Azabu University in Sagamihara and the National Institute for Environmental Studies said at a weekend conference that the fungus was detected in four American bullfrogs found in the wild.

The fungus was also found in 38 other frogs and newts acquired through pet shops or Internet auctions.

The chytrid fungus is blamed for a drop in the frog population and the extinction of species in Central America and Australia in recent years.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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