Deadly frog fungus found in Japan

Jun 13, 2007

A deadly parasitic fungus that has been killing frogs around the world has has been found in wild frogs in Japan for the first time.

The chytrid fungus was first detected in captive imported frogs, Kyodo news service said Tuesday.

Researchers from Azabu University in Sagamihara and the National Institute for Environmental Studies said at a weekend conference that the fungus was detected in four American bullfrogs found in the wild.

The fungus was also found in 38 other frogs and newts acquired through pet shops or Internet auctions.

The chytrid fungus is blamed for a drop in the frog population and the extinction of species in Central America and Australia in recent years.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

add to favorites email to friend print save as pdf

Related Stories

European newts invade Australia

Jun 30, 2014

Once confined behind pet shop windows, the smooth newt (Lissotriton vulgaris) –a 'controlled pest animal' in Victoria – has made a new home in Melbourne's peri urban fringe.

Two new salamander species discovered by Colombian researchers

Feb 11, 2013

(Phys.org)—A team of young researchers from Colombia have recently published an article in the journal Zootaxa describing two new species of salamander discovered during a project supported by the Conservation Leadership Programme and Save Our ...

Recommended for you

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

3 hours ago

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research at Washington University School ...

Meteorite that doomed dinosaurs remade forests

5 hours ago

The meteorite impact that spelled doom for the dinosaurs 66 million years ago decimated the evergreens among the flowering plants to a much greater extent than their deciduous peers, according to a study ...

New camera sheds light on mate choice of swordtail fish

7 hours ago

We have all seen a peacock show its extravagant, colorful tail feathers in courtship of a peahen. Now, a group of researchers have used a special camera developed by an engineer at Washington University in ...

User comments : 0