Scientists create a 'Pavlov's cockroach'

Jun 13, 2007

Japanese researchers have created a "Pavlov's cockroach" by demonstrating classical conditioning of salivation in cockroaches.

The study led by Makoto Mizunami and colleagues at Tohoku University marks the first time such sophisticated neural control of autonomic functioning has been demonstrated in a species other than dogs and humans.

The researchers said although the underlying neural mechanisms remain elusive, the results provide a useful model for studying the cellular basis of conditioning of salivation in the simpler nervous system of insects.

The research is presented in the current issue of the online journal PLoS One.

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

Explore further: Dairy farms asked to consider breeding no-horn cows

Related Stories

When unhealthy foods hijack overeaters' brains

Apr 20, 2009

(AP) -- Food hijacked Dr. David Kessler's brain. Not apples or carrots. The scientist who once led the government's attack on addictive cigarettes can't wander through part of San Francisco without craving a local shop's ...

Moths with a Nose for Learning

Oct 02, 2008

Much like Pavlov conditioned his dog to salivate in anticipation of food when a bell rang, insects can be trained to perform certain behaviors when enticed with different smells. Researchers at the National ...

Recommended for you

Dairy farms asked to consider breeding no-horn cows

Mar 28, 2015

Food manufacturers and restaurants are taking the dairy industry by the horns on an animal welfare issue that's long bothered activists but is little known to consumers: the painful removal of budding horn ...

Italian olive tree disease stumps EU

Mar 27, 2015

EU member states are divided on how to stop the spread of a disease affecting olive trees in Italy that could result in around a million being cut down, officials said Friday.

China starts relocating endangered porpoises: Xinhua

Mar 27, 2015

Chinese authorities on Friday began relocating the country's rare finless porpoise population in a bid to revive a species threatened by pollution, overfishing and heavy traffic in their Yangtze River habitat, ...

A long-standing mystery in membrane traffic solved

Mar 27, 2015

In 2013, James E. Rothman, Randy W. Schekman, and Thomas C. S├╝dhof won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discoveries of molecular machineries for vesicle trafficking, a major transport ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.