Dutch zoo breeds own jellyfish

September 29, 2007

Marine biologists at a Dutch zoo say they have succeeded in the difficult task of breeding jellyfish in captivity.

Max Janse, head of the marine area inside Burgers' Zoo, said adult jellyfish have a very short lifespan and are almost impossible to import.

Breeding jellyfish is also very difficult. The process developed at the zoo involves a series of breeding tanks for different stages of the life cycle. Janse said creating a real ocean environment is also crucial.

The jellyfish start out as small polyps, then change into red larvae and finally become small transparent jellyfish.

"When you keep jellyfish you have to keep 'reading' the animals," he told Radio Netherlands. "You also have to have a lot of patience and be willing to continually adapt your strategy."

Copyright 2007 by United Press International

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