Venice fights creeping Chinese seaweed

June 27, 2006

Venetian officials are reportedly fighting a fast-breeding giant creeping Chinese seaweed problem in the citie's fabled waterways.

The weed, Undaria pinnatifida, grows to up to 10-feet, dwarfing the far smaller weed native to the Venice lagoons, The Independent reported Tuesday, noting the Chinese seaweed matures after 40 to 60 days, producing millions of spores that can overrun smaller, local weeds with ease.

Scientists believe the invasive seaweed reached Venice on the hulls of boats or in the ballast of ships. Officials fear the seaweed might move into the city's narrower canals, choking them.

Undaria is described as one of the world's 100 most threatening invasive species, The Independent said, and it has already invaded much of the coast of New Zealand, Argentina and other parts of Europe.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers build bacteria's photosynthetic engine

July 29, 2015

Nearly all life on Earth depends on photosynthesis, the conversion of light energy into chemical energy. Oxygen-producing plants and cyanobacteria perfected this process 2.7 billion years ago. But the first photosynthetic ...

Yarn from slaughterhouse waste

July 29, 2015

ETH researchers have developed a yarn from ordinary gelatine that has good qualities similar to those of merino wool fibers. Now they are working on making the yarn even more water resistant.

Scientists unlock secrets of stars through aluminium

July 29, 2015

Physicists at the University of York have revealed a new understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars, providing insight into the role massive stars play in the evolution of the Milky Way and the origins of the Solar System.

Studies reveal details of error correction in cell division

July 29, 2015

Cell biologists led by Thomas Maresca at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, with collaborators elsewhere, report an advance in understanding the workings of an error correction mechanism that helps cells detect and ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.