New species of parrot and mouse discovered

April 6, 2006

Scientists say they've discovered new parrot and mouse species on Camiguin, the smallest of the thousands of Philippines islands.

Lawrence Heaney, curator of mammals at The Field Museum in Chicago and a member of the research team, said the bird is a hanging-parrot, or Colasisi, and the new rodent is a Philippine forest mouse with large ears and eyes, a long tail and rusty-brown fur. Neither the parrot or mouse species is found anywhere else on Earth, The Independent reported Thursday.

Camiguin was once heavily forested, but, by 2001, only 18 percent of the island was covered by rainforest.

"Knowing that at least 54 species of birds and at least 24 species of mammals live on Camiguin, and that some of these animals are found nowhere else on Earth, makes us realize how important this island is in terms of conservation," Heaney told The Independent, adding for such animals to survive extinction, the dwindling forests where they live must be protected.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

Explore further: Brain study: Singing mice show signs of learning

Related Stories

Brain study: Singing mice show signs of learning

October 10, 2012

Guys who imitate Luciano Pavarotti or Justin Bieber to get the girls aren't alone. Male mice may do a similar trick, matching the pitch of other males' ultrasonic serenades. The mice also have certain brain features, somewhat ...

Recommended for you

Male seahorse and human pregnancies remarkably alike

September 1, 2015

Their pregnancies are carried by the males but, when it comes to breeding, seahorses have more in common with humans than previously thought, new research from the University of Sydney reveals.

Brazilian wasp venom kills cancer cells by opening them up

September 1, 2015

The social wasp Polybia paulista protects itself against predators by producing venom known to contain a powerful cancer-fighting ingredient. A Biophysical Journal study published September 1 reveals exactly how the venom's ...

Parasitized bees are self-medicating in the wild, study finds

September 1, 2015

Bumblebees infected with a common intestinal parasite are drawn to flowers whose nectar and pollen have a medicinal effect, a Dartmouth-led study shows. The findings suggest that plant chemistry could help combat the decline ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.