Poll: Phone video appeals to consumers

March 28, 2006

A survey Tuesday showed cell-phone video services are appealing to U.S. consumers.

JupiterResearch said its forecast for the U.S. wireless market found that 41 percent of wireless phone subscribers surveyed said they were interested in video over their phones.

The forecast predicts that mobile video will grow from $62 million last year to $501 million in 2010.

At the same time, however, video-subscription rates remain in the single digits and reflect a desire for good content at good prices.

"Longer term adoption will depend more on business models and content offerings than on the technology or devices," said Jupiter Vice President David Schatsky. "Our research shows that there's strong consumer interest in consuming mobile video, but consumers are just not interested in paying large fees for mediocre content."

Jupiter found that 17 percent of subscribers were interested in live television on their phones compared to 11 percent drawn to pre-recorded video clips.

Copyright 2006 by United Press International

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